Monday, July 27, 2009

The latest issue of The Reasoner is available ...

... here.

Here is what you will find in this issue:

"Editorial - Matteo Morganti
Interview with Wolfgang Spohn - Matteo Morganti
Book: Argumentation in Artificial Intelligence - Iyad Rahwan
Journal: Dialogue and Discourse - David Schlangen
Conditionals, 11 May - Matthias Unterhuber
Argument cultures, 3-6 June - Hans V. Hansen, Christopher W. Tindale, J. Anthony Blair &
Ralph H. Johnson
Aim of belief, 11-13 June - Timothy Chan
Arche Scepticism Conference, 13-14 June - Dylan Dodd
Non-classical Mathematics, 18-22 June - Petr Cintula & Greg Restall
Consciousness and the Self, 25 June - Mary Leng and Stephen McLeod
Strategies-I, 26 June - Soumya Paul
Multiplicity and Unification in Statistics and Probability, 25-26 June - Sami Stouli
Knowledge Discovery from Uncertain Data, 28 June - Ming Hua
Two Streams in the Philosophy of Mathematics: Rival Conceptions of Mathematical Proof,
1-3 July - Brendan Larvor
European Epistemology Network, 4-5 July - Christoph Kelp
Beyond Classical Bayesian Estimation Theory, 6-9 July - Vesa Klumpp & Uwe D. Hanebeck
Converging Technologies, Changing Societies, 7-10 July - Katinka Waelbers
Imprecise Probability: Theories and Applications, 14-18 July - Matthias Troffaes & Frank
Logic and Rational Interaction - Olivier Roy
Chrysippus - Andrew Aberdein
Logical Foundations of Probability, Rudolf Carnap - Jan-Willem Romeijn

The Reasoner ( is a monthly digest highlighting exciting
new research on reasoning, inference and method broadly construed. It is
covering research in, e.g., philosophy, logic, AI, statistics, cognitive science,
law, psychology, mathematics and the sciences.

The Reasoner welcomes submissions:
- Submitted articles (100-1000 words)
- Submitted items of news
- Letters
- Conference announcements
- Job announcements
- Advertisements

Jon Williamson, Editor
Federica Russo, Features Editor
Lorenzo Casini, News Editor"

Thursday, July 9, 2009

Progic 2009: 4th Workshop on Combining Probability and Logic

General information, including the program, can be found here.

Sunday, July 5, 2009


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22nd European Summer School in Logic, Language and Information
ESSLLI 2010, 9-20 August, 2010, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
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The European Summer School in Logic, Language and Information (ESSLLI) is organized every year by the Association for Logic, Language and Information (FoLLI, in different sites around Europe. The main focus of ESSLLI is on the interface between linguistics, logic and computation. ESSLLI offers foundational, introductory and advanced courses, as well as workshops, covering a wide variety of topics within the three areas of interest: Language and Computation, Language and Logic, and Logic and Computation. Previous summer schools have been highly successful, attracting up to 500 students from Europe and elsewhere. The school has developed into an important meeting place and forum for discussion for students and researchers interested in the interdisciplinary study of Logic, Language and Information.
For more information, visit the FoLLI website, as well as ESSLLI’2009 website:
The ESSLLI 2010 Program Committee invites proposals for foundational, introductory, and advanced courses, and for workshops for the 22nd annual Summer School on important topics of active research in the broad interdisciplinary area connecting logic, linguistics, computer science, and the cognitive sciences, structured within the 3 traditional ESSLLI streams:
- Language and Computation
- Language and Logic
- Logic and Computation
We also welcome proposals that do not exactly fit one of these categories.
PROPOSAL SUBMISSION: All proposals should be submitted, using a prescribed form that will be available soon on the ESSLLI 2010 website, through EasyChair on, not later than Monday, September 7, 2009.
Proposers must hold PhD or equivalent degrees and should follow the guidelines below while preparing their submissions; proposals that do not conform with these guidelines may not be considered.

ALL COURSES: Courses are given over one week (Monday-Friday) and consist of five 90 minutes sessions, one per day. Course proposals should give a brief overview of the topic and a tentative content and structure of the course, as well as state the course’s objectives and clearly specify prerequisites, if any. Lecturers who want to offer a long, two-week course, should submit two independent one-week courses (for example an introductory course in the first week of ESSLLI, and a more advanced course during the second). The ESSLLI program committee has the right to select only one of the two proposed courses.
Sep 7, 2009: Proposal Submission Deadline
Oct 19, 2009: Notification Deadline
Jun 30, 2010: Deadline for receipt of camera-ready course material by the ESSLLI’2010 local organizers
FOUNDATIONAL COURSES: These are strictly elementary courses not assuming any background knowledge. They are intended for people who wish to get acquainted with the problems and techniques of areas new to them. Ideally, they should allow researchers from other fields to acquire the key competencies of neighboring disciplines, thus encouraging the development of a truly interdisciplinary research community. Foundational courses should require no special prerequisites, but may presuppose some experience with scientific methods and general appreciation of the field of the course.
INTRODUCTORY COURSES: Introductory courses are central to the activities of the Summer School. They are intended to provide an introduction to the (interdisciplinary) field for students, young researchers, and other non-specialists, and to equip them with a good understanding of the course field's basic methods and techniques. Such courses should enable experienced researchers from other fields to acquire the key competencies of neighboring disciplines, thus encouraging the development of a truly interdisciplinary research community. Introductory courses in, for instance, Language and Computation, can build on some knowledge of the component fields; e.g., an introductory course in computational linguistics should address an audience which is familiar with the basics of linguistics and computation. Proposals for introductory courses should indicate the level of the course as compared to standard texts in the area (if any).
ADVANCED COURSES: Advanced courses should be pitched at an audience of advanced Masters or PhD students. Proposals for advanced courses should specify the prerequisites in detail.
WORKSHOPS: Workshops run over one week and consist of five 90-minutes sessions, one per day. The aim of the workshops is to provide a forum for advanced Ph.D. students and other researchers to present and discuss their work. Workshops should have a well defined theme, and workshop organizers should be specialists in the theme of the workshop. The proposals for workshops should justify the choice of topic, give an estimate of the number of attendants and expected submissions, and provide a list of at least 15 potential submitters working in the field of the workshop. The organizers are required to give a general introduction to the theme during the first session of the workshop. They are also responsible for the organization and program of the workshop including inviting the submission of papers, reviewing, expenses of invited speakers, etc. In particular, each workshop organizer will be responsible for sending out a Call for Papers for the workshop and to organize the selection of the submissions by the deadlines specified below. The call for workshop submissions must make it clear that the workshop is open to all members of the ESSLLI community and should indicate that all workshop contributors must register for the Summer School.
Sep 7, 2009: Proposal Submission Deadline
Oct 19, 2009: Notification Deadline
Nov 02, 2009: Deadline for submission of the Calls for Papers to ESSLLI’2010 PC chair
Nov 09, 2009: Workshop organizers send out First Call for Papers
Jan 25, 2010: Workshop organizers send out Second Call for Papers
Mar 08, 2010: Workshop organizers send out Third Call for Papers
Apr 12, 2010: Suggested deadline for submissions to the workshops
May 24, 2010: Suggested deadline for notification of workshop contributors
Jun 30, 2010: Deadline for submission of camera-ready copy of workshop proceedings to the ESSLLI’2010 Local Organizers.
Notice that workshop speakers will be required to register for the Summer School; however, they will be able to register at a reduced rate to be determined by the Local Organizers.
FORMAT FOR PROPOSALS: A form for submitting course and workshop proposals will be available soon on the ESSLLI 2010 website
The proposers are required to submit the following information:
* Name(s) of proposing lecturer(s)/ workshop organizer(s), at most two per course or workshop
* Contact addresses, homepages, phones, and fax numbers (if available), of proposing lecturer(s)/ workshop organizer(s);
* Title of proposed course/workshop;
* Type (workshop, foundational, introductory, or advanced course)
* Stream (one of: Language & Computation, Language & Logic, Logic & Computation)
* Description (in at most 300 words, provide justification, relevance to ESSLLI, proposed contents and structure of the courses, resp. expected participation in the workshops)
* External funding (whether the proposers will be able to obtain external funding for travel and accommodation expenses)
* Further particulars (any further information that is required by the above guidelines should be included here; in particular, course objectives and prerequisites, as well as the lecturers teaching experience relevant to the proposed course, and generally in the interdisciplinary field scope of ESSLLI.)
FINANCIAL ASPECTS: Prospective lecturers and workshop organizers should be aware that all teaching and organizing at the summer schools is done on a voluntary basis in order to keep the participants fees as low as possible. Lecturers and organizers are not paid for their contribution, but are reimbursed for travel and accommodation (up to fixed maximum amounts, that will be communicated to the lecturers upon notification). It should be stressed that while proposals from all over the world are welcomed, the School cannot guarantee full reimbursement of travel costs, especially from destinations outside Europe. Please note that in case a course or workshop is to be taught/organized by two lecturers, a lump sum will be reimbursed to cover travel and accommodation expenses for one lecturer; the splitting of that sum is up to the lecturers.
The local organizers would highly appreciate it if, whenever possible, lecturers and workshop organizers find alternative funding to cover travel and accommodation expenses, as that would help us keep the cost of attending ESSLLI’2010 lower.

Chair: Valentin Goranko (Technical Univ. of Denmark)
Area Specialists:
Language and Computation:
Walter Daelemans (Univ. of Antwerp)
Sabine Schulte im Walde (Univ. of Stuttgart)
Language and Logic:
Yoad Winter (Utrecht Univ.)
Raffaella Bernardi (Free Univ. of Bozen-Bolzano)
Logic and Computation:
Anuj Dawar (Univ. of Cambridge)
Ken Shan (State Univ. of New Jersey, Rutgers)
ESSLLI 2010 Program Committee dedicated email account:
Chair: Vincent Hendricks (University of Copenhagen)
Organizing Manager: Rasmus Rendsvig
ESSLLI 2010 website: